Cultural Climate and Linguistic Style: Change in English by Gillian Cawthra

By Gillian Cawthra

A e-book exploring the relation among tradition and syntax on the finish of the nineteenth and the start of the 20 th centuries. The research of specific syntactic gains in novels of the time exhibits transparent changes of utilization that may be visible to mirror present social upheaval.

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By Gillian Cawthra

A e-book exploring the relation among tradition and syntax on the finish of the nineteenth and the start of the 20 th centuries. The research of specific syntactic gains in novels of the time exhibits transparent changes of utilization that may be visible to mirror present social upheaval.

Show description

Read or Download Cultural Climate and Linguistic Style: Change in English Fictional Prose from the Late Victorian to the Early Modern Period PDF

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There is an average of 16 words per sentence. There are seven instances of dialogue, five of them consisting of a single clause or phrase, one containing three sentences, and one which has eight sentences including one Cultural Climate and Linguistic Style 32 (the first) which is interrupted by the narrative text (' "Well," returned Jasper, "seeing that ... " '). In contrast to Meredith's predominantly straightforward syntax, Gissing's sentence structure is often rather confused. Thus, for example, in the fifth sentence, it is not clear from the syntax whether 'with pained forehead' is meant to qualify 'her son' or 'Mrs Milvain'; and in the twentieth sentence'of expensive material' is syntactically more complicated than it needs to be, it would be simpler to use a complement group after 'were'.

3,9,5. Patterns of Language 43 12. 6, 8, 2, 4. 13. 8, 1, 9, 4, 6. 14. 2, 7, 3, 9, 2, 2, 5; 10, 2, 5, 8; 8, 7, 2. This pattern breaks down into 14 full stops, no colons, two semicolons, 31 commas, no dashes, no exclamation marks, no question marks, and four single inverted commas (in tWo pairs, used to isolate two words). Lawrence's punctuation breaks the text down into fairly small sections. There is one section with 18 words, and 11 sections with only one or two words, but most contain five to eleven words.

Pulmonary' produces 'cold' and 'Pole' as well as 'heart'. The second strand is of those words loosely associated with human beings and society, both those which deal with their environment ('the drawing-room') and those which refer to their activities ('played'): played - social life - human nature - the drawing-room of civilized men and women - we have - the struggling outer world - the impressionable senses - have we - the watchmaker's eye - a definite situation for a number of characters - pursuit of them and their speech - hunts the spirit in men - persuading you to believe - you will see - the value - a run at his heels the world - the world's wisdom - the generations - they took to writing - to be profitable to us - who - the notable humouristwho - travel - dancing - on their toes - explorers tell us catching breath - dogs at bones about a table - staggers - the heart - ages - the very heart of us - we manage - our pages - Patterns of Language 29 the crow-scalp - that solitary majestic outsider - we may get him - we want - more present with us - you ken of - our great lord and master There is no real change of subject between paragraphs with this strand as there was with the first.

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