Caligula : a biography by Emperor of Rome. Caligula; Emperor of Rome Caligula; Most,

By Emperor of Rome. Caligula; Emperor of Rome Caligula; Most, Glenn W.; Psoinos, Paul; Winterling, Aloys; Schneider, Deborah Lucas; Emperor of Rome Caligula

The notorious emperor Caligula governed Rome from A.D. 37 to forty-one as a tyrant who finally grew to become a monster. a really shrewdpermanent and cruelly witty guy, Caligula made his contemporaries worship him as a god. He drank pearls dissolved in vinegar and ate meals lined in gold leaf. He pressured women and men of excessive rank to have intercourse with him, became a part of his palace right into a brothel, and devoted incest along with his sisters. He desired to make his horse a consul. Torture and executions have been the order of the day. either smooth and historic interpretations have concluded from this alleged proof that Caligula used to be insane. yet used to be he?

This biography tells a unique tale of the well known emperor. In a deft account written for a normal viewers, Aloys Winterling opens a brand new point of view at the guy and his occasions. Basing Caligula on an intensive new overview of the traditional assets, he units the emperor's tale into the context of the political approach and the altering kin among the senate and the emperor in the course of Caligula's time and unearths a brand new rationality explaining his infamous brutality.

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By Emperor of Rome. Caligula; Emperor of Rome Caligula; Most, Glenn W.; Psoinos, Paul; Winterling, Aloys; Schneider, Deborah Lucas; Emperor of Rome Caligula

The notorious emperor Caligula governed Rome from A.D. 37 to forty-one as a tyrant who finally grew to become a monster. a really shrewdpermanent and cruelly witty guy, Caligula made his contemporaries worship him as a god. He drank pearls dissolved in vinegar and ate meals lined in gold leaf. He pressured women and men of excessive rank to have intercourse with him, became a part of his palace right into a brothel, and devoted incest along with his sisters. He desired to make his horse a consul. Torture and executions have been the order of the day. either smooth and historic interpretations have concluded from this alleged proof that Caligula used to be insane. yet used to be he?

This biography tells a unique tale of the well known emperor. In a deft account written for a normal viewers, Aloys Winterling opens a brand new point of view at the guy and his occasions. Basing Caligula on an intensive new overview of the traditional assets, he units the emperor's tale into the context of the political approach and the altering kin among the senate and the emperor in the course of Caligula's time and unearths a brand new rationality explaining his infamous brutality.

Show description

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In return the number of bequests to the emperor rose enormously, and the emperor remembered all aristocrats of highest rank in his own will. “Friendship” with the emperor thus acquired a new function, as the all-important mechanism for regulating relationships within the aristocracy. The traditional rivalries once expressed in terms of direct amity or hostility were now transformed into a competition for access to the emperor and his favor. Here, too, Augustus had succeeded in unifying contraries by using the new hierarchical system of relationships based on the emperor’s favor but behaving as if it were still the old one of close personal friendships between equals.

Ann. 5–6). This man known for his courage brought up the problem that usually went unmentioned, in conjunction with a clear indication of his readiness to submit to the emperor’s wishes, but, as Tacitus reports, at the same time he could not avoid embarrassing Tiberius. The situation was worsened by a change in the traditional relationships in the Roman aristocracy. These had been governed by a multi-polar system of political friendships: Friends visited one another at home for the salutatio, a formal morning reception, and for banquets in the evenings; they supported one another with the votes of their clients at elections or votes in the Senate; and they left each other bequests in their wills.

The members of the aristocracy, whose goal in life—as in other pre-modern aristocratic societies—was to acquire honor and fame, depended for that purpose on exercising political functions and holding office as magistrates. Success in these endeavors determined an individual’s ranking in the social hierarchy of the aristocracy, and this status was visible in many aspects of everyday life: in the order in which senators voted; in seating at theatrical performances in Rome; in the number of followers who paid morning calls at the home of a successful aristocratic politician and accompanied him to the Forum; in the location and size of his house, and in the luxury displayed there, especially at dinners and banquets.

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