Britannia: The Failed State: Ethnic Conflict and the End of by Stuart Laycock

By Stuart Laycock

At its top a posh and prosperous kingdom, by means of the tip of the 4th and starting of the fifth centuries Roman Britain was once on the aspect of cave in. It used to be quickly changed by way of Anglo-Saxon tradition which migrated around the North Sea. This soaking up research explores the tensions and conflicts among a few of the tribal groupings that made up Roman Britain and examines how tribal and political fragmentation may have contributed to its fall. It analyzes Roman Britain now not as a unified entity yet as a suite of alternative peoples with a historical past of long term clash, and reveals parallels in glossy conflicts that offer perception into the lacking items of this complicated interval of British history.

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By Stuart Laycock

At its top a posh and prosperous kingdom, by means of the tip of the 4th and starting of the fifth centuries Roman Britain was once on the aspect of cave in. It used to be quickly changed by way of Anglo-Saxon tradition which migrated around the North Sea. This soaking up research explores the tensions and conflicts among a few of the tribal groupings that made up Roman Britain and examines how tribal and political fragmentation may have contributed to its fall. It analyzes Roman Britain now not as a unified entity yet as a suite of alternative peoples with a historical past of long term clash, and reveals parallels in glossy conflicts that offer perception into the lacking items of this complicated interval of British history.

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Their use as labels is not perfect but it enables easy discussion of the peoples of Britain in a way that becomes much more difficult if we have constantly to identify nameless groups by their attributes. The use of terms such as ‘southern kingdom’ or ‘eastern region’ or even the use of modern county names (as sometimes now happens) to denote groups of Britons in the pre-Roman period may be neutral but seems rather to duck the issue. We know for certain that the Britons in question did not refer to themselves in any of those ways, but there is at least a possibility they used some, or all, of the names of the Roman period as listed by Ptolemy.

42 It is possible, therefore, that Durotrigan territory included two sub-groups, one based around Dorchester and another centred on Ilchester. The Durotrigan economy was probably based largely on mixed farming and it has even been suggested that the area was already exporting food in the pre-Roman period. 43 Durotrigan tribal territory also included some other valuable resources. 44 It has been suggested from the evidence of coin patterns that the relationship between the two tribes in the area may not always have been a peaceful one, and competing claims to the mineral resources of the area may have been one reason for this.

This area was centred on Calleva (7) and included eastern Berkshire. 34 The distribution of Atrebatic coin finds also suggests the territory of the Atrebates may have originally stretched as far north as the Thames in this region but, if so, their dominance soon came under pressure from the southward expansion of Catuvellaunian influence. Earthworks at Calleva indicate the development of an oppidum here in the second half of the first century BC. It may represent the original base for Commius at a time when Atrebatic power was probably at its strongest in this region.

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