Ain't I a Woman: Black Women and Feminism by bell hooks

By bell hooks

A vintage paintings of feminist scholarship, Ain't I a lady has develop into a must-read for all these attracted to the character of black womanhood. reading the impression of sexism on black ladies in the course of slavery, the devaluation of black womanhood, black male sexism, racism between feminists, and the black woman's involvement with feminism, hooks makes an attempt to maneuver us past racist and sexist assumptions. the result's not anything wanting groundbreaking, giving this ebook a serious position on each feminist scholar's bookshelf.

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By bell hooks

A vintage paintings of feminist scholarship, Ain't I a lady has develop into a must-read for all these attracted to the character of black womanhood. reading the impression of sexism on black ladies in the course of slavery, the devaluation of black womanhood, black male sexism, racism between feminists, and the black woman's involvement with feminism, hooks makes an attempt to maneuver us past racist and sexist assumptions. the result's not anything wanting groundbreaking, giving this ebook a serious position on each feminist scholar's bookshelf.

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When beating failed to force the child to eat, the captain ordered that the child be placed feet first into a pot of boiling water. After trying other torturous methods with no success, the captain dropped the child and caused its death. N ot deriving enough satisfaction from this sadistic act, he then commanded the mother to throw the body of the child over­ board. The mother refused but was beaten until she submitted. The traumatic experiences of African women and men aboard slave ships were only the initial stages of an indoctrina­ tion process that would transform the African free human being into a slave.

The female slave lived in constant aware­ ness of her sexual vulnerability and in perpetual fear that any male, white or black, might single her out to assault and victim­ ize. Linda Brent in the narrative of her slave experience expressed her awareness of the black female’s plight: Slavery is terrible for men; but it is far more terrible for women. Superadded to the burden common to all, they have wrongs, and suffering, and mortifications peculiarly their own. Those sufferings peculiar to black women were directly related to their sexuality and involved rape and other forms of sexual assault.

Mungo White, an ex-slave from Alabama, recalled the conditions under which his mother worked: Her task was too hard for any one person. She had to serve as maid to Mr. White’s daughter, cook for all de hands, spin and card four cuts of thread a day, and den wash. Dere was one hundred and forty-four threads to de cut. If she didn’t get all dis done she got fifty lashes dat night. House slaves complained repeatedly about the stress and strain of being constantly under the surveillance of white owners.

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