Advisory in Urban High Schools: A Study of Expanded Teacher by K. Phillippo

By K. Phillippo

Kate Phillippo evaluates the perform of getting academics additionally function advisors, tasked with delivering social-emotional help to scholars. via an in-depth survey of teacher-advisors at 3 various city excessive faculties, she examines the several ways that advisors interpret and perform the position and the results for college students.

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By K. Phillippo

Kate Phillippo evaluates the perform of getting academics additionally function advisors, tasked with delivering social-emotional help to scholars. via an in-depth survey of teacher-advisors at 3 various city excessive faculties, she examines the several ways that advisors interpret and perform the position and the results for college students.

Show description

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Extra resources for Advisory in Urban High Schools: A Study of Expanded Teacher Roles

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Gallucci, Van Lare, Yoon, & Boatright, 2010; Spillane, Pairse & Shererer, 2011), yet teachers’ practice with regard to the social-emotional support of their students appears largely untouched. , 2007). Further, schools tend to formally differentiate the instruction of students from the social-emotional care of them, putting the former in teachers’ hands and the latter in schoolbased mental health professionals’ hands (Lortie, 2002; Phillippo & Stone, 2011), rendering teachers who provide social-emotional support out of their organizationally prescribed (or supported) range.

We propose drawing more stakeholders—including students, parents, teachers, school leaders, school-based mental health professionals, and policymakers—into this conversation and connecting it more directly to teachers’ practice in schools. A dialogue among these stakeholders, taking into account evidence of the persistent, conflicting, and unclear messages reported above, as well as the organizational constraints that schools place on student-teacher relationships, could contribute to greater clarity.

143). The school as an organizational context also shapes these relationships. Most instructional activities take place within classroom settings (Jackson, 1990), and so a majority of student-teacher relationships transpire within large groups. The development of these individual relationships, then, takes place in a setting that privileges and requires group interactions. , semester), and academic year. Other constraints are imposed by schools’ social positioning of teachers and students, in which teachers possess more power than students do and have a heavier hand in determining which students deserve their care and what teacher care should look like (Stanton-Salazar, 1997 & 2011; Valenzuela, 1999), creating substantial potential for student-teacher relationships involving a power imbalance and uneven distribution across students.

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