A Renaissance Court: Milan under Galeazzo Maria Sforza by Gregory Lubkin

By Gregory Lubkin

Bold, extravagant, innovative, and sexually infamous, Galeazzo Maria Sforza inherited the ducal throne of Milan in 1466, on the age of 22. even supposing his reign ended tragically purely ten years later, the younger prince's court docket was once a dynamic neighborhood the place arts, coverage making, and the panoply of country have been built-in with the rhythms and preoccupations of lifestyle. Gregory Lubkin explores this important yet missed middle of energy, permitting the contributors of the Milanese courtroom to talk for themselves and exhibiting how dramatically Milan and its ruler exemplified the political, cultural, non secular, and fiscal aspirations of Renaissance Italy.

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By Gregory Lubkin

Bold, extravagant, innovative, and sexually infamous, Galeazzo Maria Sforza inherited the ducal throne of Milan in 1466, on the age of 22. even supposing his reign ended tragically purely ten years later, the younger prince's court docket was once a dynamic neighborhood the place arts, coverage making, and the panoply of country have been built-in with the rhythms and preoccupations of lifestyle. Gregory Lubkin explores this important yet missed middle of energy, permitting the contributors of the Milanese courtroom to talk for themselves and exhibiting how dramatically Milan and its ruler exemplified the political, cultural, non secular, and fiscal aspirations of Renaissance Italy.

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Additional resources for A Renaissance Court: Milan under Galeazzo Maria Sforza

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Galeazzo's reign seemed to offer a better opportunity to view a repre- Page xiv sentative Renaissance court in action. It came as a surprise to discover how much information survived from that short-lived court and how important it was. My investigation of Galeazzo's court was an inquiry without preconceptions. The fifth duke of Milan has been remembered mainly for his dramatic death and some personal excesses that were played up by Machiavelli and other contemporary historians. It took years of research to discover the full dimensions of Galeazzo's fascinating story.

Many other scholars have also generated articles and essays on various aspects of the Sforza dominion; the greatest contribution has come from Caterina Santoro, the doyenne of Milanese administrative history. 25 This study has been written largely from collections in the Archirio di Stato di Milan, supplemented by crucial documents in other Milanese repositories. The Sforza archives in Milan are remarkably extensive, preserving much of the material so diligently gathered by the dukes' Privy Chancery Page xv (Cancelleria Segreta).

The Sforza dukes' feudal overlord, Holy Roman Emperor Frederick III, did not even recognize this young dynasty as the legitimate lords of Milan. Such tensions between Sforza aspirations and external limitations gave a dynamic twist to the colorful story of this Renaissance court. Conditions internal to the dominion created the foundations for the court's rich and volatile character. Renaissance Milan was a challenging dominion to govern. Not a single one of its nine dukes came to the throne without a struggle and left it peacefully through a natural death.

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