A Cognitive Theory of Cultural Meaning (Publications of the by Claudia Strauss

By Claudia Strauss

"Culture" and "meaning" are significant to anthropology, yet anthropologists don't agree on what they're. Claudia Strauss and Naomi Quinn suggest a brand new thought of cultural that means, one who provides precedence to the best way people's stories are internalized. Drawing on "connectionist" or "neural community" types in addition to different mental theories, they argue that cultural meanings will not be mounted or restricted to static teams, yet neither are they regularly revised or contested. Their strategy is illustrated by means of unique study on understandings of marriage and concepts of luck within the usa.

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By Claudia Strauss

"Culture" and "meaning" are significant to anthropology, yet anthropologists don't agree on what they're. Claudia Strauss and Naomi Quinn suggest a brand new thought of cultural that means, one who provides precedence to the best way people's stories are internalized. Drawing on "connectionist" or "neural community" types in addition to different mental theories, they argue that cultural meanings will not be mounted or restricted to static teams, yet neither are they regularly revised or contested. Their strategy is illustrated by means of unique study on understandings of marriage and concepts of luck within the usa.

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The Indians at Mashpee made and remade themselves through specific alliances, negotiations, and struggles. " (1988a:338-9) He makes the same point more generally for everyone's culture: "Culture is contested, temporal, and emergent" (1986:19). Eric Wolf made similar claims earlier: In the rough-and-tumble of social interaction, groups are known to exploit the ambiguities of inherited forms, to impart new evaluations or valences to them, to borrow forms more expressive of their interests, or to create wholly new forms to answer to changed circumstances.

33 This is not confused, just wrong, as much of the rest of this book will undertake to show. For the time being, an example Spiro (1993) gives from his fieldwork in Burma will help make this point. Spiro went to Burma to learn how a society functions when people believe the Theravada Buddhist doctrine of Anatta (no self), which can be described as follows: "Buddhism stands unique in the history of human thought in denying the existence of such a Soul, Self, or Atman. " (Rahula 1959:51; quoted in Spiro 1993:119) After Spiro had spent a few months in Burma, however, he found that he 34 Background had to change hisfieldworkplans because the Burmese villagers he talked to had not internalized the doctrine ofAnatta.

Still, that does not make that view right. ) That, of course, would be a good point to make. After all, the argument that a position is right because nearly everyone believes it is no more valid than the argument that a position is wrong because very few people believe it. ") However, there are a number of other difficulties with the strong stance Butler takes against internalization. Internal states are not necessarily innate or fixed. Butler claims that the inner (psyche, biological body)/outer (society, performance) distinction should be discarded, but, implicitly, she relies on this distinction in her assumption that inner = fixed and outer = fluid.

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